Bites & Pieces

Fairfax

Even though it’s the same crew as the previous resident, this is no Perla 2.0. Longer review soon but suffice it to say – it’s pretty great and very chill. Half Woodstock living-room, partly regular restaurant, and a lot lounge-y.

This Bite is about the completely scrumptious soft boiled egg. They got this. An auspicious soft boiled egg with the meltingly best soldiers I’ve come across. Herb splashed butter with parmigiano on sourdough toast. Sublime. Sun filled windows, comfy chair. Almost like everything is just fine with the world.

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Fairfax
234 West 4th Street
NYC
212.933.1824

Open daily Sunday-Monday 8am-10pm, Tuesday-Thursday til 11pm, Friday-Saturday til midnight Breakfast til 11:30am and Weekend Brunch til 3pm

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Bun-Ker. Bunker. Heaven.

Bun-Ker

It’s the pot of Vietnamese gold at the end of the where-the-hell-are-we-anyway rainbow. Even in its second iteration, it’s off off the beaten track.  Finding it however, is part of its charm and worth any missed turn.

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Thankfully, there is a there…there.

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Pulse quickens…

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Magic time.

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Hi ceilings, tall trees, brightly colored stools, one communal table and a smattering of others. The decor has a Tropic Thunder meets a let’s-all-get-high and have a paintball war motif. On an island. With great music.

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An actual pressed juice bar. This makes for intriguing concoctions, very creative cocktails and there’s a killer wine list too.

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Jimmy Tu and his sous-chef brother Jacky have been around the chef block. Their combined history includes Korilla BBQ truck, Tigerland, a Vietnamese spot shared with sister Judy in the East Village, as well as the ultimate springboard – being one of the original opening chefs at Eleven Madison. And somewhere in between, they shadowed street carts in Vietnam too, studying recipes, and finessing tools of the trade that would become a signature, like a Japanese grill with binchotan charcoal.

They ultimately landed in their own seafood distribution company, Fish and Ship, which unfortunately met its match with Hurricane Sandy. Not to be outdone by the storm, Jimmy and his posse of hip-hop loving skating buddies, dried out the space and created a tiny kaleidoscope of a Vietnamese food shack in Ridgewood, Queens. The rest is beautifully defined Hanoi specialties with the essence of homemade street food history.  The new menu is at least double the offerings of the old place. Plans for house-made food products, skating gear, mushroom growing and more abound. It’s fun, loose, and comfortable but the genuine intent behind the food is never compromised.

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I said a hip, hop, the hippy to the hippy, to the hip hip hop, because Roy don’t stop!

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Bun-Ker Limeade, a heavenly nectar of lime, shiso, coconut sugar and basil seeds. It’s remarkably complex and so refreshing.

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Goi Du Du Char, vegan papaya salad with crispy tofu, red onion, carrot, tomato, peanut, and sesame. It has a boldness you don’t always see in the usual mandolined versions, here it’s more thickly sliced so you can really taste each gratifying component. Get it with the illustrious homemade beef jerky if you prefer meat with your papaya. This dish, like many others, can be made without meat so vegetarians don’t get the short shrift.

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Gorgeous greens, fresh herbs and rice crisps for your charcoal grilled pork skewers.

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Now you be the chef…

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Wet your rice paper and let it soften. Add sauce and condiments.

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You did it. Wrap and eat.

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Ultra fresh summer rolls filled with wild prawns, roast heritage pork, vermicelli, lots of mint, more herbs, and of course… peanut sauce. Playfully chewy and then wham, a mouthful of zesty flavor.

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Com Chien Chay, mushroom fried rice with organic mushrooms, organic egg, garlic chives, tomatoes and cashews is lovely. Plus the hints of bright lemongrass elevate rich bites of meaty mushrooms.

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Vegetarian Banh Xeo with turmeric, turns gold and is stuffed with organic shiitakes and a rad collection of herbs. The carnivore version includes shrimp, bacon, egg, and sprouts. Everything is tucked into a crunchy, crispy, succulent, oh so savory rice flour pastry, yet it’s like a delicate soufflé on the inside.  Hits high on the ethereal meter. A drizzle of Nuoc Cham provides the perfect acidity for the icing on the crepe.

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Grilled Lemongrass Black Angus Short Ribs are strewn with sweet, minty shiso leaves and chopped peanuts across the incredibly tender chunks of meat. Slightly sweet and a little smoky.  A splash of fish sauce and it pretty much melts in your mouth.

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Coconut Braised Berkshire Ribs are just that. Tender, falling off the bone meat, redolent of the coconut broth and young fruit it was simmered in.  Served with tea egg and bitter melon, the salty fragrance of the former and the sharpness of the latter are a great counterpoint to the sweetness of the coconut.

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Tomato Garlic Fried Rice is way more interesting than you might expect. Just get it. It’s subtle, sublime and you’d best like garlic.

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Suon Nuong Xa, Heritage Pork Loin marinates for about 8 hours in a mixture of lemongrass, shallots, garlic, chili peppers, fish sauce, Chinese xo sauce, oil and palm sugar, and then it’s ready to  caramelize on the grill. Dressed with scallion oil and crispy pork skin bits, plus an organic fried egg and what appears to be a simple execution exceeds any pork dishes you previously worshipped. Garlic Rice rounds out the plate. It’s always the quality of ingredients plus imagination here that solidifies the ace level of cooking and taste.

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Sweet satisfaction as your teeth crack the edge of a golden, deep fried, crispy spring roll surprisingly made from a delicate Chinese egg roll wrap.  It’s bursting with sweet lumps of fresh crabmeat, shaved carrots, and toothsome vermicelli. (The Bun in Bun-Ker is a witty play on vermicelli in Vietnamese) Bright, fresh, and snappy, the extras of lettuce, mint, and chili sauce bring it all together.

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Carmelized Wild Mexican Shrimp with ginger, garlic, basil, and sweet fried shallots in a sublime, sticky, rich sauce tasting of molasses and dates taunts my memory daily. We had this without the addition of roasted pork but by all means… Eat them whole with the shell on. It’s where the flavor happens and no peeling means no having to sneak a lick of your fingers at the table.

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Fried Whole Fish in a tamarind chili sauce. I think this one was 4 lbs, there were three of us and I’m pretty sure there wasn’t an ounce remaining. It was sweet, spicy, sour with crisped skin and I could not stop picking through the plate once it was clearly over.

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Coconut Tapioca Pudding, the pleasing nuttiness of coconut milk amplifies the sweet and sour jackfruit, bits of pineapple, palm seeds. Creamy, cold tapioca pearls refresh and soothe body and soul.

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Vietnamese cookies!

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Where’s Waldo? Where’s here? In case you needed to place yourself in the universe, this might help. Ha.

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The neighborhood may be sparse but the sentiments are graffitied for good.

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And because you may just have over ordered, the indulgence shall continue in the morning.

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Bun-Ker is popular. Hard to believe that when they first started, the group rode around on bikes and dropped off menus to drum up business. 70 seats total inside but you can still depend on a wait. Outdoor garden seating in season increases your chances for getting your hands on that crepe sooner than later. At least in this new spot, the cocktail bar, Honey specializing in mead is next door to shorten the wait time.

This is exquisite comfort food. It’s not your Chinatown inexpensive foray into Vietnamese cuisine. It’s carefully considered classic combinations that use the highest quality, well sourced, organic, grass fed, free range, straight from the Icelandic ocean kind of ingredients. The kitchen turns them into deliriously good concentrated flavors. Chefs use a mortar and pestle often, coaxing the smallest, seemingly least important ingredient into giving its utmost. Flavor opens into more flavor.

All roads seemed to have led the Tu’s back to their roots and ultimately doing what their hearts always knew best. They’ve made a huge success of it. And now it’s our success too, because the food is superb, and you’ll always leave here happy.

 

 

Bun-Ker

99 Scott Avenue

East Williamsburg (just bordering Ridgewood, Queens)

718.386.4282

Open Tuesday-Saturday noon to 11pm, Sunday noon-10pm and closed Monday

Mother’s Milk

Madre Mezcaleria

Dinner. Mezcal. Because that’s our wheelhouse these days. But very luxe having it at the new & still evolving mezcal bar – Madre Mezcaleria. The younger sibling to the much venerated El Atoradero next door. Already over fifty selections with many more to come. Plus you sip & savor with your chapulines & orange slices grazed with sal du gusano. In lay person’s terms we’re talking dried grasshoppers & a little ground worm in the orange slice spice. Spare but warm, charming atmosphere, great music a la Mexico and a small list of nice bar snacks with a raw bar to come. If you need to flavor your mezcal further.

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The delightful Fior Silvestre, a sublime combination of mezcal, grapefruit and St Germain. Bet you can’t drink just one.

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Two of the many bottles offered. The one on the right is of the  Mezcal de pechuga (breast in Spanish) variety. These are made when a finished mezcal is again distilled with local fruits, grains, nuts and the surprise of surprises – a raw chicken or turkey breast hung over the still, soaking in the vapors while also adding to the end result of the mezcal’s flavor. My favorite bottle on the left is safe for the vegetarian mezcal fan!

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The aforementioned grasshoppers and spice. Let the sip of mezcal lay on your tongue for a moment, then a nip into the orange slice and a few bits of the ‘hoppers popped in your mouth. Don’t rinse. Just repeat.

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Toothsome, tasty chips with a great guacamole and a rich black bean dip. The food advantage here is that it’s from the awesome hand of chef Denisse Lina Chavez who again reigns supreme next door. She opened this together with partner Noah Arenstein completing their mini Prospect Hts Mexican empire.

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Excellent bites to accompany all that mezcal. Shredded chicken tostadas with chipotle above and tuna tostadas below. The bar is destination worthy on its own but also works for a drink or two while you wait for your table next door.

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An unassuming oasis along the avenue. Streamlined and uncomplicated inside. The bar seats a baker’s dozen and there’s one banquette with table seating in the back.

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There’s also tequila, wine and beer in case someone joining you is not a mezcal aficionado. I have a feeling they’ll spend a little time here though and experience a sea change.

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Tiles brought from Puebla by the chef give a soupçon of fiesta, of color but always leaving the focus on the glass in front of you.

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Parting shots. Our charming bartender offers and enjoys a shot with customers as you leave. A lovely gesture especially when you need to be armed for the cold. Or even just life.

Madre Mezcaleria

706 Washington Avenue by Prospect Place

718.399.0706

Open daily 5pm – 2am

 

 

Hail To King

King

Three girls three. That’s how this tale of a boîte-to-be begins. Chefs Clare de Boer and Jess Shadbolt were working at the infamous River Cafe in London and they shared a dream. An introduction to Annie Shi, a general manager at the cutting edge Clove Club brought forth a further meeting of the minds, plus some hopes, fantasies and luckily for those of us on this side of the pond, a plan. New York City. As luck would have it, they scored the about-to-be-vacant-after-10-years space belonging to Mekong, and the rest in these short weeks gone…is history. This charming, kicky, cozy, irrefutably sublime bistro is every bit as good as the word on the street has been.

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It’s a concise, continually changing menu leaning keenly on southern Italy and northern France, a modern European take on comfort dishes, classic dishes, dishes with refinement…sparked by creativity.

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There are several tables in the small bar for dining as well as stools for a pre-dinner cocktail. Great cocktails. On the lighter side but that bartender will do a strong classic for you in a second.

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The menu includes the date because at the very least it partially changes daily.

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Carta di Musica, a favorite of mine is thin, crisp, crackling and treated to a pool of buttery oil.

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Highly enjoyable bottle from a well rounded and well priced list. Definitely one to have with food. Big and fruity, good tannins, long finish.

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Salt cod on grilled polenta was a fusion of cool, creamy, whipped, warm, crunchy. Layers of satisfaction with a nod to northern Italy’s favorite carbohydrate and an homage to the preferred dish of the Vikings, baccala, imported from them to the Veneto in the 15th century. The sweetness of the polenta counterbalances the saltiness of the cod. It’s a great bite with a glass of red wine but I think I’d love it for breakfast as well. Breakfast wine up to you.

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Fresh ricotta with lentils and marinated anchovy was lovely. The anchovies provide a umami quality offering depth and complexity to those earthy stalwarts, the lentils. Perfecting the plate is the familiar pair of lush ricotta and bitter greens. All together, comfort at its level best.

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Hand cut tagliarini with chanterelles and parmesan was both hearty and delicate. It gives you that sense of place, maybe a cozy trattoria on a snowy Italian afternoon? Though its hook translates seductively as a contemporary dish of an evening in west Soho.

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To paraphrase a favorite Preston Sturges line from The Lady Eve , the halibut roasted over lemon leaves with braised spinach and baby artichokes was a poem. Each bite was a delight, traversing from spinach to fish to artichoke and back again. I couldn’t stop eating it. And the lemon leaves…ahhh. Our lovely waiter suggested we sniff them and then lick them. In all earnestness!  He was right, the fragrant lemony aromatic fills your senses and somehow lends a deeper understanding to the French-ness of the dish.

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Slow cooked Florentine fennel was soft, deep and carmelized. A pleasing side dish.

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Prune and cognac are classic companions and though this prune and cognac tart wasn’t grand, it was definitely good. A thin riser of pastry laid with a cozy cover of custard that suspended juicy prunes and was lightly baked.

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The atmosphere is bright and spirited with the intermingling of a busy kitchen and chatty clientele, almost like a big family dinner with every recognizable character at the table. Except it has an understated elegance, is nothing short of charming and neighboring diners don’t eat off your plate.

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The always evolving menu provides an ideal canvas for the chef’s mastery and style. Their appetite for timeless dishes enhanced with an edgy imagination appears effortless, and offers the warmest of invitations. Flavors are straightforward, satisfying, beguiling. Service is on point, everyone working seems to be having a good time and interested in sharing that with the room.

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Alchemy is in play here, this trio of women, the food they create, the ambience they’ve fostered…the magnetism is inescapable. It’s the kind of place you wish was in your own neighborhood but wouldn’t think twice about hopping an uber to pretend that it is.

King

18 King Street with entrance at Sixth Avenue

917.825.1618

Closed Sunday. Monday-Wednesday 5:30pm-Midnight Thursday-Saturday till 1am

Attaboy Atoboy!

Atoboy

Korean food is turning NYC on its head. There are the wonderful do it yourself BBQ places in Koreatown, the tried and true traditional that are always worth returning to and now some newer spots with a more contemporary focus and a bit of panache have joined the scene, like Her Name Is Han and Don’s Bogam. Gourmet experiences like Oiji and Jungsik opened people’s eyes to a whole other level of Korean cuisine, pitting gourmet Korean against any high end competition. It’s exciting. But now…we have the sublime, convivial, spectacular experience of Atoboy.

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The entry way…

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Atoboy is the first Korean restaurant to offer modern Korean Banchan style food. It’s small plates, essentially Korean side dishes to share, the kind of dishes usually offered at the buffet table but here they are the draw. The basic precept is that you order 3 dishes, lighter to more substantial from columns A, B & C and it’s a flat price of $36 per person, per three dishes. You may add as much food as you like at the a la carte prices, of $7, $9, $12 so there’s no need to feel pressured and start deal making at the table. We succumbed to greed though we really didn’t need to, it was just that good. And cards on the table?  I ended up repeating two dishes.

It’s akin to being in an art gallery lost somewhere in time. Urban zen meets industrial polished peeling concrete, snappy hanging lights, a sea of wooden four tops and copper table accents. Somehow it feels cozy.

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Service is warm, friendly and welcoming.

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Atoboy was started by Chef Junghyun Park, a former Chef de Cuisine at Jungsik along with his manager wife Ellia Park, who’d previously been at Kajitsu, Maialino & Noreetuh. They wanted a kitchen where they could offer traditional Korean techniques featuring seasonal local ingredients but with their own modern take. Chef Park still combines a global roster of elements in his cooking but with his carefully considered plating and sophisticated, discerning hand – he showcases his Korea.

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Iced corn silk tea. My Korean friend who dined with me said this can cure many ills and is not so easy to find well made.

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Pop top sake! Plus you get to keep the glass. I’m planning for a full service.

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Ohmine Junmai Sake. It had the scent and sweetness of white peaches, it’s inexpensive and was definitely fun to drink. Like a Jello pudding packet.

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There were two of us and we shared our six choices. And then some. Starting with the amuse, extra crunchy seaweed nori chips, pickled and fermented vegetables and I knew the Parks were onto something.

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Juicy littleneck clams are set on a bed of creamy avocado coulis, anchored by crunchy rice crackers and accented with the fiery spiciness of the gochugaru based sauce. It’s sensational and the fully constructed bite of hot, creamy, succulent clams against the texture of the cracker was resounding.

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Well, this was something else. Eggplant with snow crab, tomato jelly and lemon. Any photo of it could not possibly convey the true depth and beauty of the flavors. The sweet crab is hidden under the eggplant and then wha what? It’s that unexpected tomato jelly. It’s strange and wonderful, an invigorating bite of summer. This dish was also a repeat. Had to.

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A bowl of white rice comes with your selections or you can opt for the always evolving special rice for an extra two bucks. This night it was seaweed rice, a worthy expenditure.

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Shrimp with kale and garlic in gochujang, a savory, fermented red chile paste was a light, fragrant, spunky palate pleaser. Excellent.

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I could eat this for breakfast or dinner every day. A distinctive, herbaceous egg truffle custard with shiitakes and leeks. Comfort food 2.0. Maybe 4.0. It was deep. Kind of has an addictive mystique. We got this twice.

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Mackerel with green chilies, scallions and radish. What goes on here? The fish is cooked perfectly, it’s soft and flavorful. But then you have this sauce, oh the sauce…a partially sweet yet almost tart essence that’s hard to get enough of.

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Riding the current wing craze, lightly fried chicken on a shoal of spicy peanut butter sauce flecked with fried garlic chips is transcendent, if fried chicken can go beyond a material universe. It’s bright, airy, battered with rice flour and tapioca. This IS actually finger lickin’ good. It defies the photo and the menu description. You’ll be running your finger along the plate when it’s finished, you won’t be able to stop yourself.

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The corn with taleggio, bacon and bean paste won’t last past corn season so if you’re in need of a last big hug of summer delight, this is it. It’s thick, salty, and gooey. It’s my mantra.

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There’s a small very concentrated list of beer, wine, sake, sochu, and four lovely cocktails. including a very tasty pear sangria. After two glasses of my pop top sake, we shared a glass of rosé but then felt we needed a lovely dry sake to finish off the dinner. This tried and true bottle was it. Clean, crisp, balanced, dry – a true match for the food.

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The plates are custom made for them by Solibaker, a Korean based ceramicist and they’re fantastic. The aprons, inspired by traditional Korean clothing, are an integral part of the overall graceful minimalist design.

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The menu is seasonal and that might mean by the week not the four quarters of the year. Dishes vary from visit to visit, highlighted by what’s locally available and tend to be replaced altogether sooner than later. Lunch is planned for the near future as is an in-restaurant cart hosting another level of food choices to enjoy. I might want to live here. Apparently they took their name from an old Korean saying where ‘Ato’ means ‘gift’. That makes sense. These are beautifully presented small plates of food, little packages of joy.    Chef Park is a wunderkind with sauces and since Korean food is not a bread friendly table, you need the rice, because you definitely don’t want to miss a drop.

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Atoboy

43 East 28th Street between Park/Madison Avenue

646.476.7217

Open Monday-Saturday 530pm-10pm

 

 

 

The Other Japanese

Autre Kyo Ya

You can’t leave this restaurant and not feel like you’ve just arrived home from a delightful trip far far away. . This post is about a lovely late spring dinner but every season is supremely celebrated here.

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It’s an intricate balance of French and Japanese influenced cooking with timely ingredients found locally and in Japan that are then applied to more traditional French techniques. West meets east then congas through shifting seasonality to create something else entirely. Chefs Shuji and Takashi both worked at Kyo-Ya and also come from backgrounds that include French training for Shuji as well as Takashi’s experience from Kajitsu, the lovely Japanese focused vegetarian restaurant in midtown.

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They took over a restaurant called The Barrel but the decor is very fitting for them. Elegant but comfortable. Warm and glowing.

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They have sake, wine, beer plus an interesting cocktail list, lighter and Japanese focused with elements like yuzu citrus jam and edible flowers. Plus there’s a cocktail hour from 530pm – 7pm with $1 oysters. So no excuses for not going.

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The menu is less extravagant than the mothership of Kyo-Ya, their mainly kaiseki restaurant on East ninth street. And while that restaurant, near and dear to my heart and tastebuds is remarkably unique, the thinking here too is intriguing and creative.

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Hand made plates.

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Goma-Tofu Cocktail with house-made sesame tofu, bonito-kombu broth & hanaho flower.

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A chilled and layered broth in a martini glass with excellent house-made sesame tofu that has just enough texture to keep it lively. Beautifully leveled tastes that incorporate hojiso, the sprigs of the shiso plant studded with tiny cupped flowers with seeds and miyoga, the young tender buds of the Japanese ginger plant. Executed masterfully and very inventive.

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Hokkaido Sea Urchin Consomme Gelee with onset-style egg. Delicate uni topped with edible flowers, an utterly opulent slow poached egg ever so gently cooked, in a gelée crossed with the very present sweetness of parsnip puree. The chilled broth melts on your tongue, the citrus aromatics really brighten and balance the richness of the egg. It’s smooth, viscous, ethereal. A fabulous dish.

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Gindara Tsubu-Miso, Miso marinated black cod with roasted shallots & pickled kohlrabi, you might think ubiquitous but you’d be wrong.

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Next are several dishes involving mushrooms, oysters,  seafood tempura, daikon and custard. All distinctive and gratifying.

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From the spring seasonal menu, White Asparagus and Seared Scallop with scallop dashi sauce, candy beet & watermelon radish. A playful combination of creamy, crispy, sweet and mild.

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Sakura Ebi Kamadaki Rice, the claypot rice dish of the evening, assembled and served at the table.

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Kakiage, mitsuba greens, myoga, ponzu, yuzu-kosho. Toothsome kernels of rice flavored by fish and smoke. It’s a refined but deep layering of tastes.

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They serve sake with true panache.

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Between Kyo-Ya, the ultra serene cocktail bar Angel’s Share and Sunrise Mart, one of the better places for Japanese food shopping in the city and just next door, the owners have created a mini empire in the East Village. And at Autre they also pay attention to execution and beautiful presentation. And they succeed. Autre, opened less than a year ago is a bit more casual, more affordable than its counterpart and less exotic. But that doesn’t mean it’s not stellar and its own experience. Because it is and it is.

 

Autre Kyo Ya

10 Stuyvesant Street between Second/Third Avenue

212.598.0454

Open:

Tues-Wed 5:30pm–11pm (last call 10:30pm)

Thurs-Fri 5:30pm-12am (last call 11:30pm)

Sat 11am-12am (last call 11:30pm)

Sun 11am-10pm (last call 9:30pm)

DINNER & WEEKEND BRUNCH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Behind The Green (Blue) Door

Karasu

Door #1, 2 or 3…hmmm. Always a chance you’ll miss the prize if you choose wrong, but not here. First door takes you into Walter’s, an agreeably hip neighborhood pub. Could be a very pleasant evening. Views of Fort Greene Park, cocktails, raw bar, fried chicken, weekend brunches. You know the drill. And it’s good. But if you march yourself straight to the back of the dining room and push open door #2, you will tumble down a chic NYC rabbit hole and find yourself in a speakeasy of the Japanese persuasion.

A peek through the Walter’s window…

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Door # 1

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We pass through tables of people enjoying themselves, the Walter’s hostess nods as we stare ahead purposefully. We follow her lead to the way back, an unlit hall and a large blue door. #2. She opens it, gesturing for us to go inside. We’ve arrived into cozy sophistication, an alternate universe of dining, imbibing, charm. Jazz spinning on a turntable, good jazz. Nothing to do but live a little.

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Art deco lighting, flattering and indirect of course, with Japanese blonde screens, deep blue walls, all hand built by the owners out of a former doctor’s office.

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Gorgeous bar. Big beveled mirror. Congenial waitstaff in very cool jackets with large buttons and small pockets. It’s all sumptuous, lush, au courant but not precious.

Owners Dylan Dodd and Danny Minch along with Head Chef Yael Peet, chef Josh Goldstein,  and infamous barkeep Thomas Waugh have created something they refer to as Kyoto casual, a modern take on seriously seasonal Japanese dining. Peet’s offerings take strong influences from izakaya, robata and kaiseki cuisine with an ever changing menu. It’s all sensational. Mr Waugh hails from ZZ’s Clam Bar and the Major Food Group, and has devised a grand list of incredible Japanese whiskeys and sakes. Sometimes a classic drink is the thing, but should you be feeling frisky and devil may care, he has a coterie of cocktails re-imagined with timely Japanese ingredients, augmenting smoky, sweet, citrus, creatively inspired beauties guaranteed to tease and thrill. I’m talking about the cocktails.

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A friend had the Smoked Palomino with mezcal, sherry and grapefruit. August in a glass. Layers of smoky citrus and then a head spin as you hit notes of sherry.

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I had the Ginger Baker, partly because I’m a tequila fan but also because he is one of the greatest  drummers of all time. Reason enough to drink him. The reposado tequila, oolong tea, ginger and cassis were surprisingly complex and incredibly good. I had more than one.

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Hoyo “Sawayaka Junmai”. Soft and easy. One of many choices on a list of great sakes.

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It’s a 40 seat Japanese cocktail bar turning out a mean mix of spirits as well as divine food. As is the new normal, dishes are meant for sharing and are divided into snacks, raw bar, smaller plates and larger plates.

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Previous press tells the story of the name, Dylan Dodd was in a Seattle antiques shop and found a little carved figure that seemed very Japanese. Returning to Brooklyn with it in hand and without a name for the new spot, one of the Japanese chef’s suggested Karasu – loosely translated as little crow. Perfect.

Otsumami means bar snack of the day and we were lucky enough to be there for a favorite, uni wrapped in nori. It was sweet, briny, buttery. I can easily see sitting at the bar one day, nosing down one of the more rare whiskeys and indulging in several plates of these.

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Can potato salad be ambrosial? Yes Virginia. If it’s Japanese potato salad topped with miso and sesame seeds. Taking an American classic and flipping it upside-down. The Japanese way. Addictive is a word flung far and wide to cover almost anything lately but it seriously applies here.

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Karaage duck wings, four plump wing drums dressed with a kicky, spicy  sesame sauce and adorned with scallions.

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House made tagliatelle with uni in a smoky butter. I often feel that with uni pasta, there’s never enough of the prize ingredients to really be satisfying, but Chef Peet’s version is Japanese comfort at its best, a gratifying, impeccably composed dish that won’t let you go until the tears have stopped.

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Tonkatsu pork chop. With cabbage as it should be. Breading that’s light and crispy. Also as it should be. Because that’s how you do.

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Impeccable Donburi bowl, ocean trout sushi with ikura and rice. A tonic for these warm days.

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The whole fish is a meaty seafood parade of shiso pesto on a perfectly cooked daurade ordered with a side of seaweed flecked miso koshihikari rice. Superb. This is a dish to dive into, fingers, chopsticks, fork, whatever you can use quickly before a dining companion gets the better of you. Break apart the white filet, that lightly seasoned fatty skin, avoid the bones. You’re golden.

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Apparently one of the more revelatory reasons to get here pronto is for the aged prime rib steak rubbed with fermented koji rice then dipped into the accompanying vinegar sauce  – which seems to be akin to doing peyote in the Teachings of Don Juan. Mind blowing. We only had one steak eater at the table and it’s quite a substantial dish, so next time. It’s going to be the talk of the town if it isn’t already. Don’t miss out.

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Summer focused ice creams were offered for dessert – ginger, green tea matcha, and black sesame. I think flavors vary daily but these were sublime.

Sweet change.

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Karasu isn’t old world traditional but it’s also not hipster hell. It’s a gem. A grown up good time. Door #3 is the door to your heart, because you’ll like it here and will have found a new place to love. It’s a find. Especially when you push through the wardrobe door and…well…find it.

Karasu

166 DeKalb Avenue, Fort Greene *located in the back of Walter’s

347.223.4811

Closed Tuesdays / Kitchen open weeknights 5:30-11:30 and weekends till midnight. The bar is open later.